Jonathan Stone

What was the inspiration behind your artwork?

All of my work is based on sparking life-long fascination with our planet. Phase was a mineral specimen that entranced me, visible evidence of repeated starts-and-stops in growth, caused by changes in the level of water the void in which the crystal formed, each capturing a pause in the progression towards the final termination of the quartz crystal. Transition is a Persied meteor in its last fractions of a moment of existence, as it transitions to light and heat courtesy of the first friction it has encountered after billions of years of orbit. The illuminated path of an airplane’s travel hints at a simultaneous, although exaggerated, human time-scale.

What do you see as the similarity between science and art? Why is science-art important in today's society?

I see them as an inspiration to each other, art and science both frame the abstract with different formalities and intents. The desire to discover, capture, codify and formalize fascination via creative expression has been a human instinct since we left handprints on a cave wall in Lascaux; it has continued through people like Leonardo Da Vinci and Zora Neale Hurston who famously phrased, “Research is formalized curiosity. It is poking and prying with a purpose.”

Get to know the artist!

Jonathan Stone, Photographer of Minerals, Mostly

Get in touch!

Follow Jonathan Stone on Instagram @studiomineralia and see more art at https://www.stonestones.rocks/

Behind the scenes

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